Hydrodynamic cavitation for the rapid separation and electrochemical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef

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Abstract

Foodborne illnesses are a major contributor to misery and health challenges in both rich and poor nations. Illnesses from pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts account for most of the cases of diarrhea in the world. Many standard methods exist for detecting these pathogens in water. However, these standard methods do not readily translate to the detection of the same pathogens in food. Detection techniques for pathogens in food are often inadequate, due to their inability to completely separate pathogens from food matrices. In this paper, we present a technique to separate and detect both Escherichia coli cells and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts that have been embedded in ground meat. We achieve this objective by combining enzymatic digestion of the meat, hydrodynamic cavitation to disassemble pathogens from the meat, immunomagnetic separation to purify meat samples and indirect electrochemical detection of the target pathogens. Our use of hydrodynamic cavitation to separate pathogens is compared against an industry standard separation technique. Results indicate that the use of hydrodynamic cavitation amplifies the detection capabilities of our sensing technique and is overall comparable to or better than conventional stomacher sample preparation.

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Nze, U. C., Beeman, M. G., Lambert, C. J., Salih, G., Gale, B. K., & Sant, H. J. (2019). Hydrodynamic cavitation for the rapid separation and electrochemical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef. Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 135, 137–144. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2019.04.002

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