The "I believe" and the "I invest" of Work-Family Balance: The indirect influences of personal values and work engagement via perceived organizational climate and workplace burnout

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Abstract

Based on Schwartz's (1992, 1994) Human Values Theory and the Conservation of Resources Theory (Hobfoll, 1988, 1998, 2001), the present research sought to advance the understanding of Work-Family Balance antecedents by examining personal values and work engagement as predictors of Work-Family Conflict via their associations with perceived organizational climate and work burnout. The results of two studies supported the hypotheses, and indicated that perceived organizational climate mediated the relations between values of hedonism, self-direction, power, and achievement and Work-Family Conflict, and that work burnout mediated the relations between work engagement and Work-Family Conflict. Theoretical and practical implications regarding individual differences and experiences of Work-Family Balance are discussed.

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APA

Chernyak-Hai, L., & Tziner, A. (2016). The “I believe” and the “I invest” of Work-Family Balance: The indirect influences of personal values and work engagement via perceived organizational climate and workplace burnout. Revista de Psicologia Del Trabajo y de Las Organizaciones, 32(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rpto.2015.11.004

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