The impact of secondary phyllosilicate minerals on the engineering properties of various igneous aggregates from greece

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Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of alteration on the physicomechanical properties of igneous rocks used as aggregates, from various areas from Greece. The studied lithologies include serpentinized dunites, serpentinized harzburgites, serpentinized lherzolites, metamorphic gabbros, diabases, dacites and andesites. Quantitative petrographic analysis shows that the tested samples display various percentages of secondary phyllosilicate minerals. Mineral quantification of the studied rock samples was performed by using the Rietveld method on X-ray diffraction patterns. The samples were also tested to assign moisture content (w (%)), total porosity (nt (%)), uniaxial compressive strength (UCS (MPa)) and Los Angeles abrasion test (LA (%)). The influence of secondary phyllosilicate minerals on the physicomechanical behavior of the tested samples was determined using regression analysis and their derived equations. Regression analysis shows a positive relationship between the percentage of the phyllosilicate minerals of the rocks and the moisture content as well as with the total porosity values. In mafic and ultramafic rock samples, the relationships between the secondary phyllosilicate minerals and their physicomechanical properties have shown that the total amount of the secondary phyllosilicate minerals results negatively on their physicomechanical properties. On the other hand, the low percentage of phyllosilicate minerals in volcanic rocks can’t be able to define their engineering properties.

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Petrounias, P., Giannakopoulou, P. P., Rogkala, A., Lampropoulou, P., Koutsopoulou, E., Papoulis, D., … Hatzipanagiotou, K. (2018). The impact of secondary phyllosilicate minerals on the engineering properties of various igneous aggregates from greece. Minerals, 8(8). https://doi.org/10.3390/min8080329

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