Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes

17Citations
Citations of this article
38Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

You May have access to this PDF.

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the influence of a simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m above sea level) for a 3 h recovery period following intense interval running on post-exercise inflammation, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin response. Methods: In a cross-over design, ten well-trained male endurance athletes completed two 8 × 3 min interval running sessions at 85 % of their maximal aerobic velocity on a motorized treadmill, before being randomly assigned to either a hypoxic (HYP: F IO2 ~0.1513) or a normoxic (NORM: F IO2 0.2093) 3 h recovery period. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately post-exercise, and after 3 and 24 h of recovery. Blood was analyzed for interleukin-6, serum iron, ferritin, erythropoietin, and hepcidin. Results: Interleukin-6 was significantly elevated (p < 0.01) immediately post-exercise compared to baseline (NORM: 1.08 ± 0.061 to 3.12 ± 1.80) (HYP: 1.32 ± 0.86 to 2.99 ± 2.02), but was not different between conditions. Hepcidin levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.01) at 3 h post-exercise for both conditions when compared to baseline (NORM: 3.25 ± 1.23 to 7.40 ± 4.00) (HYP: 3.24 ± 1.94 to 5.42 ± 3.20), but were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the HYP trial compared to NORM. No significant differences existed between HYP and NORM for erythropoietin, serum iron, or ferritin. Conclusion: Simulated altitude exposure (~2,900 m) for 3 h following intense interval running attenuates the peak hepcidin levels recorded at 3 h post-exercise. Consequently, a hypoxic recovery after exercise may be useful for athletes with compromised iron status to potentially increase acute dietary iron absorption. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Badenhorst, C. E., Dawson, B., Goodman, C., Sim, M., Cox, G. R., Gore, C. J., … Peeling, P. (2014). Influence of post-exercise hypoxic exposure on hepcidin response in athletes. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114(5), 951–959. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-014-2829-6

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free