The Influence of Religious Affiliation on Participant Responsiveness to the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) Lifestyle Intervention

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Abstract

? 2015, The Author(s).Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA (21.3 and 78.7?%, respectively) individuals (n?=?7172) participating in the Complete Health Improvement Program, a 30-day diet and lifestyle intervention, in North America (241 programs, 2006?2012) were assessed for changes in selected chronic disease risk factors: body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), pulse, lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Reductions were greater among the non-SDA for BMI, pulse and blood lipids. Furthermore, the majority of non-SDA in the highest risk classifications for BP, lipids and FPG, but only some lipids among SDA, were able to show improvement by 20?% or more.

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Kent, L. M., Morton, D. P., Ward, E. J., Rankin, P. M., Ferret, R. B., Gobble, J., & Diehl, H. A. (2016). The Influence of Religious Affiliation on Participant Responsiveness to the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) Lifestyle Intervention. Journal of Religion and Health, 55(5), 1561–1573. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-015-0141-3

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