Inhibitory effects of the ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction-mediated herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir system on ovarian cancer in mice

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction mediated (UTMD) herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and ganciclovir (GCV) system on ovarian cancer (OC). This study was conducted between June and December 2012 in the Animal Biosafety Level III Laboratory of Wuhan University. Mice with OC were randomly divided into four groups: i) HSV-TK plus microbubbles (MBs) plus ultrasound (US) (n=15); ii) HSV-TK plus US (n=15); iii) HSV-TK (n=15); and iv) phosphate-buffered saline (n=15). The inhibitory effect and survival time in the experimental groups were compared with those in the control group. The TK protein expression was detected by western blot analysis. Tumor cell apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and caspase-3 activity analysis. The data showed that the efficiency of HSV-TK gene transfection and the tumor inhibitory effects were significantly increased in the HSV-TK plus MBs plus US group compared with those in the control group (P<0.01). UTMD-mediated HSV-TK treatment has also improved the rat survival rate (P<0.01). In conclusion, UTMD can effectively transfect the HSV-TK gene into target tissues and exert a significant inhibitory effect on OC in mice.

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Zhou, X. L., Shi, Y. L., & Li, X. (2014). Inhibitory effects of the ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction-mediated herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase/ganciclovir system on ovarian cancer in mice. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 8(4), 1159–1163. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2014.1877

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