Initial treatment phase in early psychosis: Can intensive home treatment prevent admission?

  • M. G
  • K. T
  • S. P
  • et al.
ISSN: 0955-6036
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Abstract

Aims and Method: The aim of this study was to describe the early treatment phase in first-episode psychosis in an area with well-established crisis resolution teams. Socio-demographic characteristics and patterns of initial treatment were investigated for all individuals with first-episode psychosis identified prospectively over a 1-year period in two London boroughs. Results: Over a year, 111 people presented with first-episode psychosis. Fifty-one people (46%) were initially managed in the community, with the remaining 60 (54%) admitted to in-patient units immediately. By 3 months after presentation, a total of 80 people (72%) had been admitted and 54 (49%) had been compulsorily detained under the Mental Health Act 1983. Thirty-three people were initially managed by the crisis resolution teams and 15 of these were eventually admitted. Clinical Implications: In a catchment area in which alternatives to admission are well developed, the admission rate for first-episode psychosis was still high. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

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APA

M., G., K., T., S., P., P., B., M., H., & S., J. (2006). Initial treatment phase in early psychosis: Can intensive home treatment prevent admission? Psychiatric Bulletin, 30(7), 243–246. Retrieved from http://www.embase.com/search/results?subaction=viewrecord&from=export&id=L44018645

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