Injury current modulates afterdepolarizations in single human ventricular cells

22Citations
Citations of this article
18Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objective: Injury current (I(injury)) and afterdepolarizations are thought to play an important role in arrhythmias that occur during acute ischemia. However, little is known about the effects of I(injury) on afterdepolarizations. The present study was designed to study the effect of I(injury) on afterdepolarizations and action potentials in single human ventricular cells. Methods: The patch-clamp technique was used to record action potentials and to apply I(injury) to human ventricular cells. In these cells, early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs and DADs) were induced by 1 μM norepinephrine. I(injury) was simulated by coupling cells via a variable coupling resistance to a passive resistance circuit with a potential of 0, -20, or -40 mV, mimicking a depolarized ischemic region. Results: At all potentials, I(injury) induced depolarization of the resting membrane potential and action potential shortening. Flowing from 0 mV, I(injury) induced EADs by itself and aggravated the EADs and DADs that were induced by norepinephrine. Flowing from -40 mV, I(injury) abolished the noradrenaline- induced EADs and DADs. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that I(injury) may either prevent or promote the occurrence of afterdepolarizations in human ventricle. The latter holds if conduction is slowed to such an extent that it permits flow of current from depolarized ischemic cells at plateau level to cells in phase 3 or phase 4. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Verkerk, A. O., Veldkamp, M. W., De Jonge, N., Wilders, R., & Van Ginneken, A. C. G. (2000). Injury current modulates afterdepolarizations in single human ventricular cells. Cardiovascular Research, 47(1), 124–132. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0008-6363(00)00064-X

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free