Insights into the coupling of duplication events and macroevolution from an age profile of animal transmembrane gene families

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Abstract

The evolution of new gene families subsequent to gene duplication may be coupled to the fluctuation of population and environment variables. Based upon that, we presented a systematic analysis of the animal transmembrane gene duplication events on a macroevolutionary scale by integrating the palaeontology repository. The age of duplication events was calculated by maximum likelihood method, and the age distribution was estimated by density histogram and normal kernel density estimation. We showed that the density of the duplicates displays a positive correlation with the estimates of maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, and the oxidation events played a key role in the major transitions of this density trace. Next, we focused on the Phanerozoic phase, during which more macroevolution data are available. The pulse mass extinction timepoints coincide with the local peaks of the age distribution, suggesting that the transmembrane gene duplicates fixed frequently when the environment changed dramatically. Moreover, a 61-million-year cycle is the most possible cycle in this phase by spectral ana lysis, which is consistent with the cycles recently detected in biodiversity. Our data thus elucidate a strong coupling of duplication events and macroevolution; furthermore, our method also provides a new way to address these questions. © 2006 Ding et al.

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APA

Ding, G., Kang, J., Liu, Q., Shi, T., Pei, G., & Li, Y. (2006). Insights into the coupling of duplication events and macroevolution from an age profile of animal transmembrane gene families. PLoS Computational Biology, 2(8), 0918–0924. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.0020102

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