Inspiratory muscle warm-up has no impact on performance or locomotor muscle oxygenation during high-intensity intermittent sprint cycling exercise

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle (IM) warm-up on performance and locomotor muscle oxygenation during high-intensity intermittent sprint cycling exercise. Ten subjects performed identical exercise tests (10 × 5 s with 25-s recovery on a cycle ergometer) after performing one of two different IM warm-up protocols. The IM warm-up consisted of two sets of 30 inspiratory efforts against a pressure-threshold load equivalent to 15 % (PLA) or 40 % (IMW) of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP). MIP was measured with a portable autospirometer. Peak power and percent decrease in power were determined. Oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. The MIP increased relative to baseline after IMW (115 ± 21 vs. 123 ± 17 cmH2O, P = 0.012, ES = 0.42), but not after PLA (115 ± 20 vs. 116 ± 17 cmH2O). Peak power (PLA: 10.0 ± 0.6 vs. IMW: 10.2 ± 0.5 W kg−1), percent decrease in power (PLA: 13.4 ± 5.6 vs. IMW: 13.2 ± 5.5 %), and changes in O2Hb levels (PLA: −10.8 ± 4.8 vs. −10.7 ± 4.1 μM) did not differ between the trials. IM function was improved by IMW. However, this did not enhance performance or locomotor muscle oxygenation during high-intensity intermittent sprint cycling exercise in untrained healthy males.

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APA

Ohya, T., Hagiwara, M., & Suzuki, Y. (2015). Inspiratory muscle warm-up has no impact on performance or locomotor muscle oxygenation during high-intensity intermittent sprint cycling exercise. SpringerPlus, 4(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-015-1355-2

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