Intense exercise training is not effective to restore the endothelial NO-dependent relaxation in STZ-diabetic rat aorta

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intense physical training on vascular function in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. We focused on the endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and stable ADP adenosine-5'- O - (2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPbetaS). METHODS: Control or diabetic male Wistar rats (n=44) were randomly assigned to sedentary or trained groups. The training program consisted in a regular period of running on a treadmill during 8 weeks (10 degrees incline and up to 25 m/min, 60 min/day). The reactivity of isolated thoracic aorta rings of healthy, diabetic and/or trained has been tested. RESULTS: ACh and ADPbetaS-induced EDR were observed in phenylephrine (PE) pre-contracted vessels. As compared to sedentary control group, diabetic rats showed an increase in PE-induced contraction and a decrease in ACh and ADPbetaS-induced EDR (p<0.05). Moreover, there were no increase in ACh and ADPbetaS-induced EDR in diabetic rats. N-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester inhibited the nitric oxide synthase in diabetic and control rats, thereby resulting in a strong inhibition of the EDR induced by ACh and ADPbetaS (10-6 M). CONCLUSION: Diabetes induced an endothelium dysfunction. Nevertheless, our intense physical training was not effective to restore the aorta endothelial function.

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Zguira, M. S., Vincent, S., Le Douairon Lahaye, S., Malarde, L., Tabka, Z., & Saïag, B. (2013). Intense exercise training is not effective to restore the endothelial NO-dependent relaxation in STZ-diabetic rat aorta. Cardiovascular Diabetology, 12(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2840-12-32

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