Interactions between striped bass (Morone saxatilis) rebuilding programmes and the conservation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and other anadromous fish species in the USA

10Citations
Citations of this article
32Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Anadromous populations of striped bass occur along the Atlantic coast of the US from Maine to North Carolina. Recruitment overfishing and declining water quality led to substantial reductions in striped bass abundance during the 1970s and 1980s. Cooperative interstate fishery management of striped bass began in 1981, with the development of a fishery management plan by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, an organization of Atlantic coastal states. Effective fishery management and additional research and monitoring contributed to a tenfold increase in abundance of striped bass stocks by the late 1990s. This dramatic increase resulted in increased predation on a variety of anadromous fish species including American shad, blueback herring, and alewives. Predation by striped bass on Atlantic salmon smolts in North America has been documented, but the impact of this predation has not been quantified. Moderate to strong correlations were found between estimates of striped bass abundance and the return of Atlantic salmon to three of the four major New England salmon rivers. Further research is required to quantify the proportion of smolt production consumed by striped bass, particularly for salmon populations listed as endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. © 2006 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Grout, D. E. (2006). Interactions between striped bass (Morone saxatilis) rebuilding programmes and the conservation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and other anadromous fish species in the USA. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 63(7), 1346–1352. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2006.03.021

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free