Knockdown of the PsbP protein does not prevent assembly of the dimeric PSII core complex but impairs accumulation of photosystem II supercomplexes in tobacco

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Abstract

The PsbP protein is an extrinsic subunit of photosystem II (PSII) specifically found in land plants and green algae. Using PsbP-RNAi tobacco, we have investigated effects of PsbP knockdown on protein supercomplex organization within the thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic properties of PSII. In PsbP-RNAi leaves, PSII dimers binding the extrinsic PsbO protein could be formed, while the light-harvesting complex II (LHCII)-PSII supercomplexes were severely decreased. Furthermore, LHCII and major PSII subunits were significantly dephosphorylated. Electron microscopic analysis showed that thylakoid grana stacking in PsbP-RNAi chloroplast was largely disordered and appeared similar to the stromally-exposed or marginal regions of wild-type thylakoids. Knockdown of PsbP modified both the donor and acceptor sides of PSII; In addition to the lower water-splitting activity, the primary quinone QA in PSII was significantly reduced even when the photosystem I reaction center (P700) was noticeably oxidized, and thermoluminescence studies suggested the stabilization of the charged pair, S2/QA-. These data indicate that assembly and/or maintenance of the functional MnCa cluster is perturbed in absence of PsbP, which impairs accumulation of final active forms of PSII supercomplexes. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Ido, K., Ifuku, K., Yamamoto, Y., Ishihara, S., Murakami, A., Takabe, K., … Sato, F. (2009). Knockdown of the PsbP protein does not prevent assembly of the dimeric PSII core complex but impairs accumulation of photosystem II supercomplexes in tobacco. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, 1787(7), 873–881. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbabio.2009.03.004

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