Knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers and patients on healthcare associated infections in a regional hospital in Ghana

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Abstract

Objective: To assess knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers (HCWs) and patients on healthcare associated infections (HAIs) in the central regional hospital in Ghana. Methods: The purposive random sampling method was used to administer questionnaires over a period of 6 months to HCWs and patients visiting the hospital. Results: A total of 210 patients and 71 HCWs were sampled. One hundred and three (53.8%) patients had some knowledge of HAIs with 52 (28.4%) being informed by a HCW compared with 63 (88.7%) of HCWs who were well informed about HAIs. Ninety-seven (46.2%) responding patient always washed their hands while 65 (31%) and 48 (22.9%) respectively sometimes or never washed their hands within or after leaving the hospital. Out of those who washed their hands, 64 (39.5%) always washed with soap while 46 (28.4%) did sometimes. This positively and significantly correlated (r=0.440, P<0.001) with knowledge on HAIs which was however insignificant in HCWs (r=0.025, P=0.835). As many as 48 (67.6%) of HCWs believed that authorities in the hospital had done little to prevent HAIs with the main reason being that the hospital was unclean. Whereas, 112 (53.3%) of patients considered the hospital clean. Twenty-seven (38%) of HCWs had had confirmed HAIs of which cholera made up 12 (16.9%) while 94 (44.8%) of patients believed they had had unconfirmed HAIs. Conclusions: Although knowledge on HAIs is adequate, low compliance on preventive techniques resulting in high HAIs indicates attitudinal change is the best means of prevention. © 2014 Asian Pacific Tropical Medicine Press.

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APA

Ocran, I., & Tagoe, D. N. A. (2014). Knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers and patients on healthcare associated infections in a regional hospital in Ghana. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease, 4(2), 135–139. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2222-1808(14)60330-3

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