Lamotrigine: Clinical experience in 200 patients with epilepsy with follow-up to four years

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Abstract

This open, clinical study describes the use of lamotrigine in 200 adults and children with drug resistant epilepsy. Lamotrigine was used largely as add-on therapy and outcome was assessed by the patients, parents and carers and the physician in terms of reduction of seizure frequency, drug side-effects and improvement in quality of life. Of the 200 patients, 70 (35%) were rendered seizure free. Lamotrigine was especially helpful in resistant primary generalized epilepsy, complex partial seizures, mixed seizures subsequent to brain damage, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and in complex partial seizures which secondarily generalized. Fifty-three patients ceased lamotrigine; 30 due to lack of effect, and 13 due to side-effects. Lamotrigine is a very useful antiepileptic medication of a 'broad spectrum' nature being effective in primary generalized epilepsy and partial seizures as add-on therapy. The side-effect profile is good with most side-effects being avoidable.

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APA

Buchanan, N. (1996). Lamotrigine: Clinical experience in 200 patients with epilepsy with follow-up to four years. Seizure, 5(3), 209–214. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1059-1311(96)80038-0

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