Lifestyle factors and metabolic syndrome among workers: the role of interactions between smoking and alcohol to nutrition and exercise.

  • JuiHua H
  • RenHau L
  • ShuLing H
  • et al.
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Abstract

This study aimed to investigate (1) relations of smoking and alcohol to metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, with nutrition and exercise controlled; and (2) interactions between smoking/alcohol and nutrition/exercise on MetS. This cross-sectional study enrolled 4025 workers. Self-reported lifestyles, anthropometric values, blood pressure (BP), and biochemical determinations were obtained. Among males, smoking significantly increased the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high triglyceride, abdominal obesity (AO), and MetS. Additionally, smoking showed significant interaction effects with nutrition on high BP, AO, and MetS; after further analysis, nutrition did not decrease above-mentioned risks for smokers. However, there was no significant interaction of smoking with exercise on any metabolic parameter. Alcohol increased the risk of AO, but decreased low HDL-C. It also showed an interaction effect with exercise on AO; after further analysis, exercise decreased AO risk for drinkers. Among females, alcohol significantly decreased the risk of high fasting blood glucose, but did not show significant interaction with nutrition/exercise on any metabolic parameter. In conclusion, in males, smoking retained significant associations with MetS and its components, even considering benefits of nutrition; exercise kept predominance on lipid parameters regardless of smoking status. Alcohol showed inconsistencies on metabolic parameters for both genders.

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APA

JuiHua, H., RenHau, L., ShuLing, H., HonKe, S., YuLing, C., & FengCheng, T. (2015). Lifestyle factors and metabolic syndrome among workers: the role of interactions between smoking and alcohol to nutrition and exercise. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Basel. Retrieved from http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/12/12/15035/htm

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