Long range electronic transport in DNA molecules deposited across a disconnected array of metallic nanoparticles

2Citations
Citations of this article
13Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

We report in detail our experiments on the conduction of DNA molecules over a wide range of temperature deposited across slits in a few nanometer thick platinum film. These insulating slits were fabricated using focused ion beam etching and characterized extensively using near field and electron microscopy. This characterization revealed the presence of metallic Ga nanoparticles inside the slits, as a result of the ion etching. After deposition of DNA molecules, using a protocol that we describe in detail, some of the slits became conducting and exhibited superconducting fluctuations at low temperatures. We argue that the observed conduction was due to transport along DNA molecules, that interacted with the Ga nanoparticles present in the slit. At low temperatures when Ga becomes superconducting, induced superconductivity could therefore be observed. These results indicate that minute metallic particles can easily transfer charge carriers to attached DNA molecules and provide a possible reconciliation between apparently contradictory previous experimental results concerning the length over which DNA molecules can conduct electricity. © 2012.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Chepelianskii, A. D., Klinov, D., Kasumov, A., Guéron, S., Pietrement, O., Lyonnais, S., & Bouchiat, H. (2012, November). Long range electronic transport in DNA molecules deposited across a disconnected array of metallic nanoparticles. Comptes Rendus Physique. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crhy.2012.10.007

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free