Long-lasting insecticidal nets in Zambia: A cross-sectional analysis of net integrity and insecticide content

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Abstract

Background: Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are a mainstay of malaria prevention in Africa. More LLINs are available now than in any time previously due to increases in funding for malaria control. LLINs are expected to last three to five years before they need to be replaced. Reports of nets lasting less than three years are frequent in Zambia, which, if true, will increase the number of LLINs needed to maintain universal coverage. Methods: This study collected nets distributed during mass distribution campaigns. One net was collected from each participating home in 12 districts in 2010 and all nets were examined for holes. One household member was surveyed about net use and care. Results: The study collected 713 polyester nets with a median age of 31 months (range 27-44 months, interquartile (IQR) range: 29-36 months), median number of holes was 17 (IQR: 5-33), and median total hole size was 88.3 sq cm (IQR: 14.5-360.4). The median total number of holes did differ by age of the net, from 27-44 months, but not in a linear fashion. The difference in the number of holes in the newest and oldest nets was not statistically significant. The mean deltamethrin level for all nets was 23 mg/sq m ¥

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Craig, A. S., Muleba, M., Smith, S. C., Katebe-Sakala, C., Chongwe, G., Hamainza, B., … Tan, K. R. (2015). Long-lasting insecticidal nets in Zambia: A cross-sectional analysis of net integrity and insecticide content. Malaria Journal, 14(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12936-015-0754-8

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