Long-Term Follow-Up of a Donor versus No-Donor Comparison in Patients with Multiple Myeloma in First Relapse after Failing Autologous Transplantation

3Citations
Citations of this article
12Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

We report the long-term clinical outcomes of a retrospective multicenter study that enrolled 169 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) in first relapse after failing autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT). After HLA typing at relapse, 79 patients with a suitable donor, 72 (91%) of whom eventually underwent salvage allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT), were compared with 90 patients without a donor who were treated with multiple lines of salvage treatment with bortezomib and/or immunomodulatory agents. At a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 2-180 months) for all patients and 110 months (range, 38-180 months) for surviving patients, 7-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 18% in the donor group and 0% in the no-donor group (hazard ratio [HR], 2.495; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.770-3.517; P <.0001). Seven-year overall survival (OS) was 31% in the donor group and 9% in the no-donor group (HR, 1.835; 95% CI, 1.306-2.577; P <.0001). By multivariate analysis, chemosensitivity to salvage treatments and presence of a suitable donor were significantly associated with better PFS and OS. The long-term follow-up of this study confirms the significant PFS benefit and provides new evidence of an OS advantage for patients with MM who have a suitable donor and undergo allo-SCT. Allo-SCT should be considered as a treatment option in young relapsed patients with high-risk disease features after first-line treatment.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Patriarca, F., Bruno, B., Einsele, H., Spina, F., Giaccone, L., Montefusco, V., … Fanin, R. (2018). Long-Term Follow-Up of a Donor versus No-Donor Comparison in Patients with Multiple Myeloma in First Relapse after Failing Autologous Transplantation. Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 24(2), 406–409. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.10.014

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free