Magnitude and Factors Affecting the Fertility Desire of People Living with HIV Infection in Ethiopia- A Cross Sectional Study

  • M Ahmed M
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Abstract

Introduction Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the major health, social and political problem in worldwide which has taken a distressing effect in many societies. It ranks fourth among the leading causes of death worldwide and first in Sub-Saharan Africa. Approximately 33.4 million people worldwide were living with HIV in 2010 and 2 million deaths ,out of this only about 40% knows their HIV status and 10 million are waiting for treatment and 5 million people are on treatment. Sub-Saharan Africa remained the most affected region in the global AIDS epidemicwhich is 22.4 million and whereas inEthiopia980000of people living with HIV [1,2]. The majority of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections that occur in children worldwide occur among children born to HIV positive mothers, who acquire the HIV infection from their mothers.Major strides have been made in recent years in expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and comprehensive care for HIV-infected men and women in sub-Saharan Africa .For many people living with HIV, ART enables a return to normal life including a resumption of sexual activity and a new or renewed desire for children. This desire is often fueled by the strong societal and traditional values attached to parenthood in sub-Saharan Africa and is further enhanced by the development of increasingly effective antiretroviral regimens to reduce the risk of HIV transmission from an infected mother to her newborn or breastfeeding child.The success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in reducing morbidity and mortality from HIV/ AIDS has been widely documented. Consequently, many HIV-infected persons are now living longer, healthier, and more productive lives.The infection rate among pregnant women in Sub-Saharan Africa is also alarmingly high, where 90% of global new child infections through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) [3-6]. Since access to antiretroviral therapy has improved quality of life and survival for HIV infected people, many will contemplate child bearing. Identification of contextual determinants of decision to have children among HIV positive couples is useful for designing of policies. African woman are being infected at an earlier age than men, and the gap in HIV prevalence between them continue to grow. At the beginning of the epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, women living with HIV were vastly at number than men. But today, there are on average 13 infected women for every 10 infected men in 2010. The majority of all new HIV infections are occurring among women of childbearing age and recent evidence shows that pregnant women may be at a higher risk of HIV infection than lactating women or non-pregnant, non-breastfeeding women. While antiretroviral treatment (ART) has improved the health Abstract Background: Sub-Saharan Africa remained the most affected region in the global AIDS epidemic which is 22.4 million and whereas in Ethiopia 980000 of people living with HIV. ART enables a return to normal life, including a resumption of sexual activity and a new or renewed desire for children.

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APA

M Ahmed, M. (2014). Magnitude and Factors Affecting the Fertility Desire of People Living with HIV Infection in Ethiopia- A Cross Sectional Study. Journal of AIDS & Clinical Research, 05(09). https://doi.org/10.4172/2155-6113.1000343

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