miR-195 in human primary mesenchymal stromal/stem cells regulates proliferation, osteogenesis and paracrine effect on angiogenesis

  • Almeida M
  • Silva A
  • Vasconcelos D
  • et al.
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Abstract

© 2015. Oncotarget. Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells (MSC) are currently being explored in diverse clinical applications, including regenerative therapies. Their contribution to regeneration of bone fractures is dependent on their capacity to proliferate, undergo osteogenesis and induce angiogenesis. This study aimed to uncover microRNAs capable of concomitantly regulate these mechanisms. Following microRNA array results, we identified miR-195 and miR-497 as downregulated in human primary MSC under osteogenic differentiation. Overexpression of miR-195 or miR-497 in human primary MSC leads to a decrease in osteogenic differentiation and proliferation rate. Conversely, inhibition of miR-195 increased alkaline phosphatase expression and activity and cells proliferation. Then, miR-195 was used to study MSC capacity to recruit blood vessels in vivo. We provide evidence that the paracrine effect of MSC on angiogenesis is diminished when cells over-express miR-195. VEGF may partially mediate this effect, as its expression and secreted protein levels are reduced by miR-195, while increased by anti-miR-195, in human MSC. Luciferase reporter assays revealed a direct interaction between miR-195 and VEGF 3'-UTR in bone cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that miR-195 regulates important mechanisms for bone regeneration, specifically MSC osteogenic differentiation, proliferation and control of angiogenesis; therefore, it is a potential target for clinical bone regenerative therapies.

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Almeida, M. I., Silva, A. M., Vasconcelos, D. M., Almeida, C. R., Caires, H., Pinto, M. T., … Barbosa, M. A. (2016). miR-195 in human primary mesenchymal stromal/stem cells regulates proliferation, osteogenesis and paracrine effect on angiogenesis. Oncotarget, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.6589

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