Mitochondria: A common target for genetic mutations and environmental toxicants in Parkinson's disease

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Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating neurological movement disorder. Since its first discovery 200 years ago, genetic and environmental factors have been identified to play a role in PD development and progression. Although genetic studies have been the predominant driving force in PD research over the last few decades, currently only a small fraction of PD cases can be directly linked to monogenic mutations. The remaining cases have been attributed to other risk associated genes, environmental exposures and gene-environment interactions, making PD a multifactorial disorder with a complex etiology. However, enormous efforts from global research have yielded significant insights into pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets for PD. This review will highlight mitochondrial dysfunction as a common pathway involved in both genetic mutations and environmental toxicants linked to PD.

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Helley, M. P., Pinnell, J., Sportelli, C., & Tieu, K. (2017, November 17). Mitochondria: A common target for genetic mutations and environmental toxicants in Parkinson’s disease. Frontiers in Genetics. Frontiers Media S.A. https://doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2017.00177

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