Modeling the impacts of the large-scale atmospheric environment on inland flooding during the landfall of Hurricane Floyd (1999)

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Abstract

The contribution of the large-scale atmospheric environment to precipitation and flooding during Hurricane Floyd was investigated in this study. Through the vortex removal technique in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the vortex associated with Hurricane Floyd (1999) was mostly removed in the model initial conditions and subsequent integration. Results show that the environment-induced precipitation can account for as much as 22% of total precipitation in the innermost model domain covering North Carolina coastal area and 7% in the focused hydrological study area. The high-resolution precipitation data from the WRF model was then used for input in a hydrological model to simulate river runoff. Hydrological simulation results demonstrate that without the tropical systems and their interactions with the large-scale synoptic environment the synoptic environment would only contribute 10% to the total discharge at the Tarboro gauge station. This suggests that Hurricane Floyd and Hurricane Dennis preceding it, along with the interactions between these tropical systems and the large-scale environment, have contributed to the bulk (90%) of the record amount of flood water in the Tar-Pamlico River Basin. © 2013 Qianhong Tang et al.

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Tang, Q., Xie, L., Lackmann, G. M., & Liu, B. (2013). Modeling the impacts of the large-scale atmospheric environment on inland flooding during the landfall of Hurricane Floyd (1999). Advances in Meteorology, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/294956

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