Modulation of manual preference induced by lateralized practice diffuses over distinct motor tasks: Age-related effects

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Abstract

In this study we investigated the effect of use of the non-preferred left hand to practice different motor tasks on manual preference in children and adults. Manual preference was evaluated before, immediately after and 20 days following practice. Evaluation was made with tasks of distinct levels of complexity requiring reaching and manipulation of cards at different eccentricities in the workspace. Results showed that left hand use in adults induced increased preference of that hand at the central position when performing the simple task, while left hand use by the children induced increased preference of the left hand at the rightmost positions in the performance of the complex task. These effects were retained over the rest period following practice. Kinematic analysis showed that left hand use during practice did not lead to modification of intermanual performance asymmetry. These results indicate that modulation of manual preference was a consequence of higher frequency of use of the left hand during practice rather than of change in motor performance. Findings presented here support the conceptualization that confidence on successful performance when using a particular limb generates a bias in hand selection, which diffuses over distinct motor tasks.

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APA

Souza, R. M., Coelho, D. B., & Teixeira, L. A. (2014). Modulation of manual preference induced by lateralized practice diffuses over distinct motor tasks: Age-related effects. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(DEC). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01406

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