Modulation of type I IFN induction by a virulence determinant within the alphavirus nsP1 protein

30Citations
Citations of this article
19Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Alphaviruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause serious human and animal diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that a determinant within the nsP1/nsP2 cleavage domain of the virulent Sindbis AR86 virus played a key role in regulating adult mouse virulence without adversely affecting viral replication. Additional characterization of this determinant demonstrated that a virus with the attenuating mutation induced more type I IFN production both in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, this phenotype was not specific to the Sindbis AR86 virus, as a similar mutation in a distantly related alphavirus, Ross River Virus (RRV), also led to enhanced IFN induction. This effect was independent of virus-induced host shutoff, since IRF-3 phosphorylation, which occurs independently of de novo host transcription/translation, was induced more robustly in cells infected with the mutant viruses. Altogether, these results demonstrate that critical determinants within the nsP1/nsP2 cleavage domain play an important role in regulating alphavirus-induced IFN responses. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Cruz, C. C., Suthar, M. S., Montgomery, S. A., Shabman, R., Simmons, J., Johnston, R. E., … Heise, M. T. (2010). Modulation of type I IFN induction by a virulence determinant within the alphavirus nsP1 protein. Virology, 399(1), 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2009.12.031

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free