A mouse model for studying nutritional programming: Effects of early life exposure to soy Isoflavones on bone and reproductive health

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Abstract

© 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that “nutritional programming” of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health.

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Ward, W. E., Kaludjerovic, J., & Dinsdale, E. C. (2016, May 11). A mouse model for studying nutritional programming: Effects of early life exposure to soy Isoflavones on bone and reproductive health. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. MDPI AG. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13050488

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