Myth of the ideal cesarean section rate: Commentary and historic perspective

32Citations
Citations of this article
51Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Attempts to define, or enforce, an "ideal" cesarean section rate are futile, and should be abandoned. The cesarean rate is a consequence of individual value-laden clinical decisions, and is not amenable to the methods of evidence-based medicine. The influence of academic authority figures on the cesarean rate in the US is placed in historic context. Like other population health indices, the cesarean section rate is an indirect result of American public policy during the last century. Without major changes in the way health and maternity care are delivered in the US, the rate will continue to increase without improving population outcomes. © 2006 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Cyr, R. M. (2006). Myth of the ideal cesarean section rate: Commentary and historic perspective. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 194(4), 932–936. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2005.10.199

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free