NAD+-dependent internalization of the transmembrane glycoprotein CD38 in human namalwa B cells

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Abstract

CD38 is a transmembrane glycoprotein involved as an orphan receptor in many physiological processes of lymphocytes. It is also a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes at its ectocellular domain the synthesis from NAD+ (cyclase) and the hydrolysis (hydrolase) of the calcium-mobilizing metabolite cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). A still unexplained paradox concerns the relationship between ectocellular localization of CD38 and intracellular calcium-releasing activity of its intermediate product cADPR. Incubation of CD38+ human Namalma B cells with external NAD+ elicited extensive membrane down-regulation of CD38 and its internalization in non-clathrin-coated vesicles. Since the internalized CD38 was demonstrated to be enzymatically active, this NAD+-dependent process is a hitherto unrecognized means for shifting cADPR metabolism from the cell surface to the intracellular environment.

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Zocchi, E., Franco, L., Guida, L., Piccini, D., Tacchetti, C., & De Flora, A. (1996). NAD+-dependent internalization of the transmembrane glycoprotein CD38 in human namalwa B cells. FEBS Letters, 396(2–3), 327–332. https://doi.org/10.1016/0014-5793(96)01125-8

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