Nitrous oxide-induced slow and delta oscillations

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Abstract

Objectives: Switching from maintenance of general anesthesia with an ether anesthetic to maintenance with high-dose (concentration >50% and total gas flow rate >4 liters per minute) nitrous oxide is a common practice used to facilitate emergence from general anesthesia. The transition from the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide is associated with a switch in the putative mechanisms and sites of anesthetic action. We investigated whether there is an electroencephalogram (EEG) marker of this transition. Methods: We retrospectively studied the ether anesthetic to nitrous oxide transition in 19 patients with EEG monitoring receiving general anesthesia using the ether anesthetic sevoflurane combined with oxygen and air. Results: Following the transition to nitrous oxide, the alpha (8-12 Hz) oscillations associated with sevoflurane dissipated within 3-12 min (median 6 min) and were replaced by highly coherent large-amplitude slow-delta (0.1-4 Hz) oscillations that persisted for 2-12 min (median 3 min). Conclusions: Administration of high-dose nitrous oxide is associated with transient, large amplitude slow-delta oscillations. Significance: We postulate that these slow-delta oscillations may result from nitrous oxide-induced blockade of major excitatory inputs (NMDA glutamate projections) from the brainstem (parabrachial nucleus and medial pontine reticular formation) to the thalamus and cortex. This EEG signature of high-dose nitrous oxide may offer new insights into brain states during general anesthesia.

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Pavone, K. J., Akeju, O., Sampson, A. L., Ling, K., Purdon, P. L., & Brown, E. N. (2016). Nitrous oxide-induced slow and delta oscillations. Clinical Neurophysiology, 127(1), 556–564. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2015.06.001

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