A Novel Antidote-Controlled Anticoagulant Reduces Thrombin Generation and Inflammation and Improves Cardiac Function in Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery

63Citations
Citations of this article
41Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Heparin and protamine are the standard anticoagulant-antidote regimen used in almost every cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedure even though both are associated with an array of complications and toxicities. Here we demonstrate that an anticoagulant aptamer-antidote pair targeting factor IXa can replace heparin and protamine in a porcine CPB model and also limit the adverse effects on thrombin generation, inflammation, and cardiac physiology associated with heparin and protamine use. These results demonstrate that targeting clotting factors upstream of thrombin in the coagulation cascade can potentially reduce the perioperative pathologies associated with CPB and suggest that the aptamer-antidote pair to FIXa may improve the outcome of patients undergoing CPB. In particular, this novel anticoagulant-antidote pair may prove to be useful in patients diagnosed with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia or those who have been sensitized to protamine, particularly patients who have insulin-dependent diabetes. © 2006 The American Society of Gene Therapy.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Nimjee, S. M., Keys, J. R., Pitoc, G. A., Quick, G., Rusconi, C. P., & Sullenger, B. A. (2006). A Novel Antidote-Controlled Anticoagulant Reduces Thrombin Generation and Inflammation and Improves Cardiac Function in Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery. Molecular Therapy, 14(3), 408–415. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymthe.2006.04.006

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free