Novel sporadic and recurrent mutations in KRT5 and KRT14 genes in Polish epidermolysis bullosa simplex patients: further insights into epidemiology and genotype–phenotype correlation

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Abstract

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a hereditary genodermatosis characterised by trauma-induced intraepidermal blistering of the skin. EBS is mostly caused by mutations in the KRT5 and KRT14 genes. Disease severity partially depends on the affected keratin type and may be modulated by mutation type and location. The aim of our study was to identify the molecular defects in KRT5 and KRT14 in a cohort of 46 Polish and one Belarusian probands with clinical suspicion of EBS and to determine the genotype–phenotype correlation. The group of 47 patients with clinical recognition of EBS was enrolled in the study. We analysed all coding exons of KRT5 and KRT14 using Sanger sequencing. The pathogenic status of novel variants was evaluated using bioinformatical tools, control group analysis (DNA from 100 healthy population-matched subjects) and probands’ parents testing. We identified mutations in 80 % of patients and found 29 different mutations, 11 of which were novel and six were found in more than one family. All novel mutations were ascertained as pathogenic. In the majority of cases, the most severe genotype was associated with mutations in highly conserved regions. In some cases, different inheritance mode and clinical significance, than previously reported by others, was observed. We report 11 novel variants and show novel genotype–phenotype correlations. Our data give further insight into the natural history of EBS molecular pathology, epidemiology and mutation origin.

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Wertheim-Tysarowska, K., Ołdak, M., Giza, A., Kutkowska-Kaźmierczak, A., Sota, J., Przybylska, D., … Kowalewski, C. (2016). Novel sporadic and recurrent mutations in KRT5 and KRT14 genes in Polish epidermolysis bullosa simplex patients: further insights into epidemiology and genotype–phenotype correlation. Journal of Applied Genetics, 57(2), 175–181. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13353-015-0310-9

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