Official Positions for FRAX® Clinical Regarding Smoking. From Joint Official Positions Development Conference of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and International Osteoporosis Foundation on FRAX®

10Citations
Citations of this article
102Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

The worldwide prevalence of smoking has been estimated at about 50% in men, and 10% in women, with larger variations among different populations studied. Smoking has been shown to affect many organ systems resulting in severe morbidity and increased mortality. In addition, smoking has been identified as a predictor of ten-year fracture risk in men and women, largely independent of an individual's bone mineral density. This finding has eventually lead to incorporation of this risk factor into FRAX®, an algorithm that has been developed to calculate an individual's ten-year fracture risk. However, only little, or conflicting data is available on a possible association between smoking dose, duration, length of time after cessation, type of tobacco and fracture risk, limiting this risk factor's applicability in the context of FRAX®. © 2011 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Dimai, H. P., & Chandran, M. (2011). Official Positions for FRAX® Clinical Regarding Smoking. From Joint Official Positions Development Conference of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and International Osteoporosis Foundation on FRAX®. Journal of Clinical Densitometry, 14(3), 190–193. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jocd.2011.05.011

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free