Part 2. Comparison of emergency washing solutions in 70% hydrofluoric acid-burned human skin in an established ex vivo explants model.

  • Burgher F
  • Mathieu L
  • Lati E
  • et al.
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
1Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Background: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a small and partially dissocd. acid (pKa 3.2), able to deeply penetrate into human skin in addn. to the corrosiveness of the hydrogen ion (H+) and the toxicity of the fluoride ion (F-). However, there has been a lack of exptl. studies to objectively characterize the results of human HF skin exposure decontamination. Methodol./principal findings: A previously established exptl. method using a human skin explants ex vivo model (Part 1. Exptl. 70% hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns: Histol. observations in an established human skin explants ex vivo model) described the lesions that appeared following 70% HF penetration. Within 5 min, 70% HF penetrates to the dermis. Using the same exptl. conditions, a comparison study of two different washing protocols was performed: water + topical calcium gluconate (CaG) vs. Hexafluorine. In these conditions, washing for 15 min with running tap water followed by topical CaG ointment only delayed burn onset, while severe tissue damage appeared later. In contrast, after washing with Hexafluorine over 10 min, no histol. lesions developed. These results are in accordance with the results of accidental human industrial case reports.Conclusion/significance: Amphoteric and hypertonic Hexafluorine can deactivate H+ and chelate F- ions. Based on these results, it should be considered as a promising first-aid decontamination soln. to prevent or minimize significant local and systemic consequences of concd. HF skin exposures. [on SciFinder(R)]

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Burgher, F., Mathieu, L., Lati, E., Gasser, P., Peno-Mazzarino, L., Blomet, J., … Maibach, H. I. (2011). Part 2. Comparison of emergency washing solutions in 70% hydrofluoric acid-burned human skin in an established ex vivo explants model. Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology, 30(2), 108–115. https://doi.org/10.3109/15569527.2010.534748

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free