Patients with chronically diseased livers have lower incidence of colorectal liver metastases: A meta-analysis

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: 70 years ago, it was put forward that the diseased liver was not a favorable soil for metastatic tumor cells. In addition, a few studies have demonstrated that rare occurrence of colorectal liver metastases among patients with fatty liver, cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection. We performed a meta-analysis to verify the association between the incidences of colorectal liver metastases with chronically diseased livers.<br /><br />METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by a search of electronic database PubMed, Cochrane Library, OVID, Web of Science and CNKI (up to February 24, 2014). Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Meta-analysis and publication bias (Bgger's test) was evaluated with STATA 12.0.<br /><br />RESULTS: A total of 10,349 colorectal cancer patients from 10 studies were included. The meta-analysis result showed there was a significant difference in the incidences of colorectal liver metastases between patients with normal and chronically diseased livers (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 95%: 0.26-0.38, P = 0.000 fixed-effects model). The result of Begg's test (Pr>|z| = 0.089; P>0.05) revealed no publication bias.<br /><br />CONCLUSIONS: The results of this meta-analysis demonstrated that patients with chronically diseased livers had significantly lower incidences of colorectal liver metastases than those with normal livers.

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Cai, B., Liao, K., Song, X. Q., Wei, W. Y., Zhuang, Y., & Zhang, S. (2014). Patients with chronically diseased livers have lower incidence of colorectal liver metastases: A meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 9(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0108618

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