Phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and killing of Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans by human neutrophils

  • Peltroche-Llacsahuanga H
  • Schmidt S
  • Lütticken R
  • et al.
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Abstract

Candida dubliniensis is a phylogenetically closely related species to Candida albicans. So far virtually nothing is known about the virulence factors of C. dubliniensis. Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) plays a critical role in adhesion of microorganisms to phagocytic cells; hydrophobic cells of C. albicans have been reported to be less sensitive to phagocytic killing than hydrophilic cells. C. dubliniensis displays CSH at 37°C in contrast to C. albicans. To elucidate this issue, we determined levels of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and killing by human neutrophils of C. dubliniensis (n = 10) compared to C. albicans (n = 10) both cultured at 37°C. Obtained test results revealed no statistically significant differences between these two yeast species for the level of phagocytosis (77.3 vs. 76.2% after 60 min), evoked oxidative burst (64.5 vs. 67.3% after 30 min) and killing (72.7 vs. 73.1% after 240 min). Therefore, human neutrophils can be considered to be equally efficient against these two yeast species. (C) 2000 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

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Peltroche-Llacsahuanga, H., Schmidt, S., Lütticken, R., Haase, G., Schnitzler, N., & Tintelnot, K. (2000). Phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and killing of Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans by human neutrophils. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 191(1), 151–155.

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