Pharmacologic roles of heparin and glucocorticoids to prevent restenosis after coronary angioplasty

56Citations
Citations of this article
13Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Restenosis after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is the major clinical problem limiting the long-term efficacy of this treatment for coronary atherosclerosis. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of restenosis indicate that intimal hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells is the predominant cause for restenosis. Therefore, therapeutic agents that inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation should be candidate drugs to prevent restenosis. Heparin has documented antiproliferative effects on smooth muscle cells, and the availability of low molecular weight heparins that lack anticoagulant properties makes them ideal agents. Glucocorticoids have wide effects on inflammatory and wound healing events and inhibit smooth muscle cell growth in culture and in animal models of arterial injury. Recent laboratory data suggest that combination therapy with both low molecular weight heparin and hydrocortisone may be a powerful treatment regimen to limit restenosis. © 1991.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Berk, B. C., Gordon, J. B., & Alexander, R. W. (1991). Pharmacologic roles of heparin and glucocorticoids to prevent restenosis after coronary angioplasty. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 17(6 SUPPL. 2), 111–117. https://doi.org/10.1016/0735-1097(91)90946-7

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free