Pogonophryne neyelovi, a new species of Antarctic short-Barbeled Plunderfish (Perciformes, Notothenioidei, Artedidraconidae) from the deep Ross Sea

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Abstract

This paper continues descriptions of new deep-water Antarctic barbeled plunderfishes of the poorly known and the most speciose notothenioid genus Pogonophryne. It is based on a comprehensive collection obtained by the authors in 2009-2010 during an Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) fishing trip. A new species, the hopbeard plunderfish Pogonophryne neyelovi, the twenty-second species of the genus, is described. The new species belongs to dorsally-spotted short-barbeled species forming the "Pogonophryne mentella" group. Pogonophryne neyelovi sp. n. is characterized by the following combination of characters: a very short and small mental barbel with an ovaloid and short terminal expansion covered by flattened scale-like processes that are mostly bluntly palmate; a moderately protruding lower jaw; a high second dorsal fin almost uniformly black and lacking a sharply elevated anterior lobe; pectoral fins striped anteriorly and uniformly light posteriorly; the anal and pelvic fins light; the dorsal surface of the head and the area anterior to the first dorsal fin covered with large, irregular dark brown blotches and spots; the ventral surface of the head, breast and belly without sharp dark markings. The new species is compared to the closest species Pogonophryne brevibarbata, Pogonophryne tronio, and Pogonophryne ventrimaculata. English vernacular names are proposed for all species of the genus.

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Shandikov, G. A., & Eakin, R. R. (2013). Pogonophryne neyelovi, a new species of Antarctic short-Barbeled Plunderfish (Perciformes, Notothenioidei, Artedidraconidae) from the deep Ross Sea. ZooKeys, 296, 59–77. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.296.4295

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