Polyploidy in Animals

104Citations
Citations of this article
91Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This chapter provides an outline of the methods used for classifying and identifying polyploid animals, followed by a discussion of proposed explanations for its relative rarity as compared to plants (where it may be near-ubiquitous).The duplication of entire genomes plays a significant role in evolution that has traditionally been reserved for plants, but in terms of ancient events, has recently expanded to include groups as diverse as yeast and vertebrates. More recent duplications of complete chromosome sets have been regarded as relatively unimportant in animal evolution. Polyploidy is often occurs only under remarkably uncommon circumstances among the metazoa and is therefore generate a curiosity than an evolutionary force in this group. The known cases of polyploid vertebrates and invertebrates are reviewed in succession, with notes about the phenotypic and evolutionary consequences interspersed throughout. It is known that polyploidy has arisen by a variety of mechanisms in a diverse array of animal taxa, covering approximately every major phylum. In part, the relatively low rate of discovery of polyploidy in animals reflects the low level of effort put into looking for it, which in turn is probably driven by the low expectation of success in finding it. In part, the relatively low rate of discovery of polyploidy in animals reflects the low level of effort put into looking for it, which in turn is probably driven by the low expectation of success in finding it. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Gregory T., R. T., & Mable, B. K. (2005). Polyploidy in Animals. In The Evolution of the Genome (pp. 427–517). Elsevier Inc. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012301463-4/50010-3

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free