Posttranscriptional (Re)programming of cell fate: Examples in stem cells, progenitor, and differentiated cells

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Abstract

How a single genome can give rise to many different transcriptomes and thus all the different cell lineages in the human body is a fundamental question in biology. While signaling pathways, transcription factors, and chromatin architecture, to name a few determinants, have been established to play critical roles, recently, there is a growing appreciation of the roles of non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins in controlling cell fates posttranscriptionally. Thus, it is vital that these emerging players are also integrated into models of gene regulatory networks that underlie programs of cellular differentiation. Sometimes, we can leverage knowledge about such posttranscriptional circuits to reprogram patterns of gene expression in meaningful ways. Here, we review three examples from our work.

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Kanellopoulou, C., & Muljo, S. A. (2018, April 9). Posttranscriptional (Re)programming of cell fate: Examples in stem cells, progenitor, and differentiated cells. Frontiers in Immunology. Frontiers Media S.A. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2018.00715

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