The Power of the Claw

6Citations
Citations of this article
15Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Scratches on bones have routinely been attributed to tooth marks (a predominantly untested speculation), ignoring the effects of claws, perhaps because of the general assumption that claws are too soft to damage bone. However, some pathologies appears to be more compatible with claw rather than tooth impacts. Therefore, it is critical to determine if the claws of any animal are capable of scratching into the surface of any bone - a test and proof of concept. A tiger enrichment program was used to document actual bone damage unequivocally caused by claws, by assuring that the tiger had access to bones only by using its paws (claws). The spectrum of mechanisms causing bone damage was expanded by evidentiary analysis of claw-induced pathology. While static studies suggested that nails/claws could not disrupt bone, specific tiger enrichment activities documented that bones were susceptible to damage from the kinetic energy effect of the striking claw. This documents an expanded differential consideration for scratch marks on bone and evidences the power of the claw. © 2013 Rothschild et al.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Rothschild, B. M., Bryant, B., Hubbard, C., Tuxhorn, K., Kilgore, G. P., Martin, L., & Naples, V. (2013). The Power of the Claw. PLoS ONE, 8(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073811

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free