Proteoglycan synthesis in bovine articular cartilage explants exposed to different low-frequency low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the role of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure parameters (exposure length, magnetic field peak amplitude, pulse frequency) in the regulation of proteoglycan (PG) synthesis of bovine articular cartilage explants. Methods: Bovine articular cartilage explants were exposed to a PEMF (75 Hz; 2 mT) for different time periods: 1, 4, 9, 24 h. Then, cartilage explants were exposed for 24 h to PEMFs of different magnetic field peak amplitudes (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 mT) and different frequencies (2, 37, 75, 110 Hz). PG synthesis of control and exposed explants was determined by Na2-35SO4 incorporation. Results: PEMF exposure significantly increased PG synthesis ranging from 12% at 4 h to 17% at 24 h of exposure. At all the magnetic field peak amplitude values, a significant PG synthesis increase was measured in PEMF-exposed explants compared to controls, with maximal effect at 1.5 mT. No effect of pulse frequency was observed on PG synthesis stimulation. Conclusions: The results of this study show the range of exposure length, PEMF amplitude, pulse frequency which can stimulate cartilage PG synthesis, and suggest optimal exposure parameters which may be useful for cartilage repair in in vivo experiments and clinical application. © 2006 Osteoarthritis Research Society International.

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De Mattei, M., Fini, M., Setti, S., Ongaro, A., Gemmati, D., Stabellini, G., … Caruso, A. (2007). Proteoglycan synthesis in bovine articular cartilage explants exposed to different low-frequency low-energy pulsed electromagnetic fields. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 15(2), 163–168. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2006.06.019

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