Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis

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Abstract

The mechanisms underlying the progression of simple steatosis to steatohepatitis are yet to be elucidated. To identify the proteins involved in the development of liver tissue inflammation, we performed comparative proteomic analysis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet (MCD) developed hepatic steatosis characterized by increased free fatty acid (FFA) and triglyceride levels as well as alpha-SMA. Two-dimensional proteomic analysis revealed that the change from the normal diet to the MCD diet affected the expressions of 50 proteins. The most-pronounced changes were observed in the expression of proteins involved in Met metabolism and oxidative stress, most of which were significantly downregulated in NASH model animals. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) is the most interesting among the modulated proteins identified in this study. In particular, cross-regulated Prx1 and Prx6 are likely to participate in cellular defense against the development of hepatitis. Thus, these Prx isoforms may be a useful new marker for early stage steatohepatitis. Moreover, curcumin treatment results in alleviation of the severity of hepatic inflammation in steatohepatitis. Notably, curcumin administration in MCD-fed mice dramatically reduced CYP2E1 as well as Prx1 expression, while upregulating Prx6 expression. These findings suggest that curcumin may have a protective role against MCD fed-induced oxidative stress.

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Lee, S. J., Kang, J. H., Iqbal, W., & Kwon, O. S. (2015). Proteomic analysis of mice fed methionine and choline deficient diet reveals marker proteins associated with steatohepatitis. PLoS ONE, 10(4). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0120577

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