Purinergic Signaling: A Common Path in the Macrophage Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Toxoplasma gondii

  • Petit-Jentreau L
  • Tailleux L
  • Coombes J
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Abstract

© 2017 Petit-Jentreau, Tailleux and Coombes. Immune responses are essential for the protection of the host against external dangers or infections and are normally efficient in the clearance of invading microbes. However, some intracellular pathogens have developed strategies to replicate and survive within host cells resulting in latent infection associated with strong inflammation. This excessive response can cause cell and tissue damage and lead to the release of the intracellular content, in particular the nucleotide pool, into the extracellular space. Over the last decade, new studies have implicated metabolites from the purinergic pathway in shaping the host immune response against intracellular pathogens and proved their importance in the outcome of the infection. This review aims to summarize how the immune system employs the purinergic system either to fight the pathogen, or to control collateral tissue damage. This will be achieved by focusing on the macrophage response against two intracellular pathogens, the human etiologic agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii.

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Petit-Jentreau, L., Tailleux, L., & Coombes, J. L. (2017). Purinergic Signaling: A Common Path in the Macrophage Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Toxoplasma gondii. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 7. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2017.00347

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