The range of spalt-activating Dpp signalling is reduced in endocytosis-defective Drosophila wing discs

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Abstract

Pattern formation along the anterior-posterior (A/P) axis of the developing Drosophila wing depends on Decapentaplegic (Dpp), a member of the conserved transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family of secreted proteins. Dpp is expressed in a stripe along the A/P compartment boundary of the wing imaginal disc and forms a long-range concentration gradient with morphogen-like properties which generates distinct cell fates along the A/P axis. We have monitored Dpp expression and Dpp signalling in endocytosis-mutant wing imaginal discs which develop severe pattern defects specifically along the A/P wing axis. The results show that the size of the Dpp expression domain is expanded in endocytosis-mutant wing discs. However, this expansion did not result in a concommittant expansion of the functional range of Dpp activity but rather its reduction as indicated by the reduced expression domain of the Dpp target gene spalt. The data suggest that clathrin-mediated endocytosis, a cellular process necessary for membrane recycling and vesicular trafficking, participates in Dpp action during wing development. Genetic interaction studies suggest a link between the Dpp receptors and clathrin. Impaired endocytosis does not interfere with the reception of the Dpp signal or the intracellular processing of the mediation of the signal in the responder cells, but rather affects the secretion and/or the distribution of Dpp in the developing wing cells. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

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APA

González-Gaitán, M., & Jäckle, H. (1999). The range of spalt-activating Dpp signalling is reduced in endocytosis-defective Drosophila wing discs. Mechanisms of Development, 87(1–2), 143–151. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0925-4773(99)00156-2

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