The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation

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Abstract

Cachexia commonly occurs at the terminal stage of cancer and has largely unclear molecular mechanisms. A recent study published in Nature Medicine, entitled “Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia,” reveals that cachectic cancer cells can secrete multiple cytokines that induce excessive fatty acid oxidation, which is responsible for muscle loss in cancer cachexia. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation using etomoxir can increase muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia animal models. The usage of stable cachexia animal models is also discussed in this research highlight.

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Qian, C. N. (2016, July 21). The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation. Chinese Journal of Cancer. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40880-016-0129-8

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