Recent acquisitions in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation

57Citations
Citations of this article
54Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a disorder characterized by both acute generalized, widespread activation of coagulation, which results in thrombotic complications due to the intravascular formation of fibrin, and diffuse hemorrhages, due to the consumption of platelets and coagulation factors. Systemic activation of coagulation may occur in a variety of disorders, including sepsis, severe infections, malignancies, obstetric or vascular disorders, and severe toxic or immunological reactions. In this review, we briefly report the present knowledge about the pathophysiology and diagnosis of DIC. Particular attention is also given to the current standard and experimental therapies of overt DIC. © 2006 Franchini et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Franchini, M., Lippi, G., & Manzato, F. (2006, February 21). Recent acquisitions in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Thrombosis Journal. https://doi.org/10.1186/1477-9560-4-4

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free