The reciprocating gait orthosis: Long-term usage patterns

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the frequency of nonusage of the reciprocating gait orthosis (RGO) in 85 patients supplied between 1986 and 1993. Reasons for nonusage and usage patterns were examined. Design: Nonusage was determined from patient records and clinical knowledge. Patients were surveyed using a detailed questionnaire to produce information on usage patterns. Setting: All patients had been treated as hospital outpatients. Patients: Most patients had congenital or acquired spinal cord lesions. Postal questionnaires were sent to 81 patients 5 to 55 years of age (mean 20.4 years). Thirty-five patients replied. Results: At a mean follow-up of 5.4 years, 71% of patients were classified as nonusers. Of the 35 respondents to the questionnaire (mean follow-up 5.5 years, range 4 to 7 years), 20 patients were nonusers. Median usage was 27 months in patients under age 18 and 24 months in adult patients. Significant differences were observed between nonusers and users in the areas of perception of the RGO as a functional tool, independence, and reliability and between the adult and the under 18 groups in the areas of weekly usage, function, independence, and reliability. Conclusion: The high level of nonusage of the RGO has implications for prescription practice. Identifying reasons for nonusage and acknowledging differences in use between age groups will help in patient assessment. © 1995 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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Sykes, L., Edwards, J., Powell, E. S., & Ross, E. R. S. (1995). The reciprocating gait orthosis: Long-term usage patterns. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 76(8), 779–783. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0003-9993(95)80534-6

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