Recruitment and retention of farm owners and workers for a six-month prospective injury study in New Zealand: A feasibility study

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Abstract

Background Agricultural workers experience high rates of occupational injury. There is a lack of analytic studies which provide detailed occupational exposure information to inform intervention development. Methods A feasibility study simulating a six month prospective cohort study was designed and undertaken. The levels of farm and worker participation and retention were analysed to determine the feasibility of the methods for wider deployment. Results Recruitment levels were comparable with other studies, with 24% of farms and 36% of non-owner workers participating. Once recruited, retention was high at 85% and 86% respectively. Conclusions The main challenges identified were in the recruitment process. Once recruited, farms and workers tended to complete the study, indicating that prospective studies in this the agricultural workforce may be feasible. Issues encountered and potential solutions for future studies are discussed

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Horsburgh, S., & Langley, J. D. (2011). Recruitment and retention of farm owners and workers for a six-month prospective injury study in New Zealand: A feasibility study. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6673-6-16

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