Relationship Between Alcohol Drinking Pattern and Risk of Proteinuria: The Kansai Healthcare Study

  • Uehara S
  • Hayashi T
  • Kogawa Sato K
  • et al.
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Abstract

© 2016 Shinichiro Uehara et al. Background: Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be associated with a decreased risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Whether drinking pattern is associated with the risk of proteinuria is unknown. Methods: Study subjects were 9154 non-diabetic Japanese men aged 40-55 years, with an estimated glomerular filtration rate ≤60 mL/min/1.73m2, no proteinuria, and no use of antihypertensive medications at entry. Data on alcohol consumption were obtained by questionnaire. We defined "consecutive proteinuria" as proteinuria detected twice consecutively as 1+ or higher on urine dipstick at annual examinations. Results: During the 81 147 person-years follow-up period, 385 subjects developed consecutive proteinuria. For subjects who reported drinking 4-7 days per week, alcohol consumption of 0.1-23.0 g ethanol/drinking day was significantly associated with a decreased risk of consecutive proteinuria (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.80) compared with non-drinkers. However, alcohol consumption of ≤69.1 g ethanol/drinking day was significantly associated with an increased risk of consecutive proteinuria (HR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.01-3.14). For subjects who reported drinking 1-3 days per week, alcohol consumption of 0.1-23.0 g ethanol/drinking day was associated with a decreased risk of consecutive proteinuria (HR 0.76; 95% CI, 0.51-1.12), and alcohol consumption of ≤69.1 g ethanol/drinking day was associated with an increased risk of consecutive proteinuria (HR 1.58; 95% CI, 0.72-3.46), but these associations did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Men with frequent alcohol consumption of 0.1-23.0 g ethanol/drinking day had the lowest risk of consecutive proteinuria, while those with frequent alcohol consumption of ≤69.1 g ethanol/drinking day had an increased risk of consecutive proteinuria.

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Uehara, S., Hayashi, T., Kogawa Sato, K., Kinuhata, S., Shibata, M., Oue, K., … Hashimoto, K. (2016). Relationship Between Alcohol Drinking Pattern and Risk of Proteinuria: The Kansai Healthcare Study. Journal of Epidemiology, 26(9), 464–470. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.je20150158

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