Renal function in children suffering from sickle cell disease: Challenge of early detection in highly resource-scarce settings

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Abstract

Background: The prevalence of Sickle cell disease is extremely high in Democratic Republic of Congo. Despite this high prevalence of the disease, data on renal abnormalities in children are rare. Method: The study proposed to assess blood pressure, glomerular function, urea and uric acid levels in 65 steady state Congolese children with homozygous sickle cell disease and 67 normal controls. Results: In Hb-SS group, blood pressure level tended to be lower than Hb-AA groups but there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) between the two groups. The absolute values for GFR corrected for BSA were significantly higher in Hb-SS group compared to Hb-AA group (130.5±34.1 ml/min/1.73 m 2 vs 113.7± 24.5 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ; p = 0.004). Children with Hb-SS were more likely to hyperfiltrate (30.8% of subjects) than children with Hb-AA (6.1% of subjects). Proteinuria was found in 4 (6.2%) children with Hb-SS. Uric acid level was significantly increased in children with Hb-SS compared to corresponding values in control group (4.4±1.3 mg/dl vs 3.5±1.1 mg/dl; p < 0.001). Urea level was significantly decreased compared to corresponding values in Hb-AA group (15.3±8.3 mg/dl vs 22.9±10.1 mg/dl; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Hyperfiltration, low creatinine, lower urea and high uric acid are more common in children with sickle cell disease than in normal controls. © 2014 Aloni et al.

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Aloni, M. N., Ngiyulu, R. M., Gini-Ehungu, J. L., Nsibu, C. N., Ekila, M. B., Lepira, F. B., & Nseka, N. M. (2014). Renal function in children suffering from sickle cell disease: Challenge of early detection in highly resource-scarce settings. PLoS ONE, 9(5). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0096561

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